Grade 10 Math – Resources by Course Expectation

Last year in second semester I taught 1 section of Grade 10 academic math (MPM2D), and 2 sections of Grade 12 data management (MDM4U). Grade 10 math was one of my favourite courses to teach as a student teacher, although I had only taught it at the applied level (MFM2P). The curriculum is so relatable, and it’s concrete enough to constantly have fun 3-act math and other similar activities that I could draw from or make in order to make the math come alive. My class was super eager and into it, and there were many “aha” moments. As a teacher, it was exciting to see my students experience math in a new way.

In order to keep myself organized, I use Google Sheets to keep track of the online resources I use for future reference and to pass on to other teachers looking for ideas.  I made one spreadsheet for each course, and within that, I have one sheet for general resources and information, and one sheet for warm up activities, blogs, and other things like spiralling resources, pedagogy and assessment ideas. I then added a new sheet for each unit: linear systems, analytic geometry, quadratics I, II and III, and trigonometry. I was not spiralling the curriculum this time, but someday I’d like to. Although I don’t like to see math as a bunch of isolated topics, this format helps keep me organized to make sure I am meeting all of the curriculum expectations.

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Below are my Grade 10 math resources, organized by unit and topic. Some of the activities I did for one unit I ended up coming back to later in order to teach a different concept. In a spiralled course, these could be blended together over a few days. My resources are geared towards Grade 10 academic (MPM2D) but many can also be done in an applied class and adjusted to meet the expectations, many of which are similar or the same. All the credit goes to the original creators of each activity, lesson or idea. If I forgot to give anyone credit for something, my sincere apologies – email me or comment and I will add it in.

Note that this is not a comprehensive list. Some of the topics I didn’t use an online resource for or haven’t found one yet. I will update this post as I find new information.

Unit 1: Linear Systems

  • Review: slope and y-intercept. Lots of activities for this – here are a couple:
    -Jon Orr’s Reading Relationships
    -Mr. Hogg’s Fast Walker
  • Review: independent/dependent variables
  • Review: graphing linear equations – Jon Orr’s Crazy Taxi (4 representations)
  • Solving systems – substitution and elimination
    -Kyle Pearce pile ups
    -Alex Overwijk – solving systems with manipulatives
  • Solving systems – word problems
    -there are a few types. One is the distance/speed/time problems – I use Jon Orr’s Two Trains

Unit 2: Analytic Geometry

  • Distance formula: Jon Orr’s distance formula without the distance formula (love this one!)
    -review of Pythagorean Theorem – Andrew Stadel’s basketball travel 
    -consolidation: Desmos Zombie Apocalypse by Andrew Stadel
  •  Equation for a circle: no link, but developed my own lesson in a similar style to the “distance formula without the formula” lesson
  • midpoint: Dan Meyer’s best midpoint (similar lessons available for best ________, but I found that too many similar type lessons gets repetitive)
  • review of equation of a line: Kyle Pearce’s paper stacks 
  • equation of the median, altitude, perpendicular bisector
  • characteristics and properties of triangles
  • verifying characteristics and properties of quadrilaterals, circles, triangles, other shapes

Quadratics I: Factoring

  • expanding and simplifying expressions: box method (no link right now)
  • review of algebra tiles: warm up – #29 on Which One Doesn’t Belong
  • common factoring
  • factoring (simple): Jon Orr’s algebra tiles for factoring
  • difference of squares and perfect squares
  • factoring complex trinomials

Quadratics II: Zeros of Quadratics

  • difference between linear and non-linear: find the pattern/group similar things together (is there a Desmos activity for this?)
  • first and second differences: I used Tips4Math’s “Going Around the Curve” activities
  • solving quadratics by factoring: used a video from Legendary Shots with an estimated distance and equation (that factors perfectly) to solve – I will blog this eventually
  • quadratic formula: Dan Meyer’s will it hit the hoop?
  • read and non-real roots
  • problem solving (word problems)

Quadratics III: Transformations and Completing the Square

  • modelling quadratics: my own performance task – see my post here
  • transformations a, h and k: Laura Wheeler’s Desmos pattern finding
  • comparing y=x^2 and y=2^x: Mary Bourassa
  • graphing y =a(x-h)^2 + k
  • determine the equation of a parabola from the graph
  • transformations activity: Desmos Faceketball
  • transformations activity: Desmos Marbleslides (so much fun!)
  • vertex midvalue method
  • completing the square
    -mathcoachblog: the box method
    -completing the square visual representation
    -whenmathhappens: why completing the square works
  • max area given perimeter: Jon Orr perimeter jumble (tweaked to focus on the Grade 10 expectation)
    -a teacher at my school has his students do the max area given set perimeter by using toothpicks to make the biggest possible area – as a square, using only 3 sides, etc.
  • other max/min problems

Trigonometry

  • review – rates, ratios, proportions, angles, congruence/similarity
    -see my post on reviewing angles here
  • comparing congruent and similar triangles: Desmos card sort – congruent triangles
  • similar triangles word problems (shadows, reflection, etc.)
  • tangent – Jon Orr’s trig through slope (love this one)
  • primary trig ratios (SOH CAH TOA): see my tweet here
  • Sine Law: see my post here
  • Cosine Law (and Sine Law): I didn’t use this personally, but maybe you will be able to use some of these visuals
  • problem solving: Dan Meyer’s marine ramp makeover (one of my favourites)

 

That’s all I’ve got. If you know of any online resources that I missed, please comment and I’ll add it to the list! Happy Friday!

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